28 stories of aids in africa

The music of these combined voices is intelligent and pained; it sings to us of suffering, stigma, compassion, courage, and heartrending love.

Each story will leave you in tears and full of intense emotions. Her natural immunity has brought doctors and researchers from as far away as Canada to study her. Scattered across the continent from the slums of Lagos, Nigeria, to the bush in southern Zambia, these Africans present a mosaic of a continent in crisis and a collective cry for help.

But in fact, it is both brilliant and enraging, and contains accounts of some extraordinary people doing courageous things to fight the epidemic which go a long way to counter other stories of hopelessness, ignorance and corrupt or inept government.

For a long time, testing positive for the virus was perceived by people as an automatic death sentence, resulting too often in changing behaviour patterns. A unique, valuable contribution to the literature on this important topic.

As Machel put it: Thankfully, there are some stories that stop you from totally giving up on humanity - from the tireless doctors who treat Aids patients to the campaigners who refuse to buy their own medication until it is freely available to all.

Writing with power and simplicity, Stephanie Nolen makes us listen, allows us to understand, and inspires us to care. Professors and sex-workers, truckers and doctors, old ladies and orphaned children, celebrities and beggars, all raise their voices here.

Without any concrete knowledge of this "disease of many names" it robbed families of one young woman or man after another and villages in despair with the ever increasing number of orphans left behind. Stephanie Nolen is an award-winning Canadian journalist who has lived in Africa for six years.

Nelson Mandela took on his own successor, Mbeki, when he realised that South African policy on the disease was causing thousands of unnecessary deaths, including that of his own son. In the developed world, pregnant women carrying the virus are given a simple treatment in labour, along with their baby, and discouraged from breastfeeding.

28 : stories of AIDS in Africa

Her ability to convey their stories vividly and with great empathy brings us as reader not only close to the unique aspects of each "case", but assists our better appreciation of cultural and political traditions and realities in African societies.

Nolen sees beneath the surfaces of these individuals, estranged and all but destroyed by governmental ineptitude and denial, and evinces their loves and hopes and family ties, their humanness, with which all others can identify.

The result is both an informative and a powerful readwhich will help Western readers connect personally with a crisis that too often seems remote. Stigmas still attached to the infection have meant that misconceptions flourish: A must read for everyone. He learned of AIDS prevention at a clinic, and, risking arrest, returned to his unit to teach his former comrades and other soldiers about using condoms.

She has walked with health care providers among remote rural communities lacking any medicines, yet trying their best to comfort and help the sick. Within all these stories is a hope that things could get better.

Through riveting, anecdotal stories, she brings to life men, women, and children involved in every aspect of the pandemic, making them familiar to us in a way they never have been before.

In Africa, fewer than 10 per cent of pregnant African women get such interventions and, unlike here, almost none are tested for HIV;HIV-positive babies are born every year, and most die before the age of five. Abstinence, promoted by international, in particular US, aid agencies as a primary method to reduce infections, is only rarely an acceptable option, Nolen contends.

This lowers the risk of transferring the virus to about 2 per cent.

Anita in Mozambique stands for many: What shines through all the stories, is determination and hope despite the odds, the courage, resolve and perseverance that the individuals show in the face of unimaginable obstacles.

Poverty remains an important factor where nutrition is inadequate, education non-existent, and money for treatment and care is not available.Stories of AIDS in Africa: A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this book in each country is being donated to AIDS support organizations in Africa.

For the past six years, Stephanie Nolen has traced AIDS across Africa, and 28 is the result: an unprecedented, uniquely human portrait of the continent in crisis. Through riveting, anecdotal stories, she brings to life men, women, and children involved in every AIDS arena, making them familiar/5(27).

Buy a cheap copy of Stories of Aids in Africa book by Stephanie Nolen. For the past six years, Stephanie Nolen has traced AIDS across Africa, and 28 is the result: an unprecedented, uniquely human portrait of the continent in 5/5(5).

28: Stories of AIDS in Africa

28 Stories of Aids in Africa. by Stephanie Nolen. Portobello £, pp This may not, at first glance, seem like an appealing book: 28 true stories of people in Africa who have HIV/Aids or have been touched by it - that's one story for each million of the estimated 28 million people infected in Africa.

Stories of Aids in Africa is a moving book compiled with stories from 28 Africans affected by AIDS (one story for every million individuals with HIV/AIDS in Africa), beautifully written by Canadian Stephanie Nolen/5.

Rage - and courage - for Africa's sick millions

For the past six years, Stephanie Nolen has traced AIDS across Africa, and 28 is the result: an unprecedented, uniquely human portrait of the continent in crisis. Through riveting, anecdotal stories, she brings to life men, women, and children involved in every AIDS arena, making them familiar.5/5(3).

Download
28 stories of aids in africa
Rated 0/5 based on 8 review